Mujitsu and Tairaku's Shakuhachi BBQ

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Tube of delight!

#1 2009-03-25 13:17:18

madoherty
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Registered: 2008-03-15
Posts: 366

Shakuhachi BBQ

I was skeptical at first, and I put it off...
...tried to put it out of my mind...
in the end I could not resist...

I BBQ-ed my shakuhachi, like the forum told me to do.  Now it does not play so good.

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#2 2009-03-25 14:06:50

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

I tried playing mine with my deriere like the guy from the legendary story but just couldn't get the right tone and made the utaguchi rather smelly.

I BBQ-ed my shakuhachi, like the forum told me to do.  Now it does not play so good.

Maybe you used too much heat or did not have the right special sauce.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#3 2009-03-25 14:18:57

Mujitsu
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From: San Francisco
Registered: 2005-10-05
Posts: 884
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

The Shakuhachi Forum recommends using the rootend only of your shakuhachi as BBQ pokers.

http://www.mujitsu.com/images/poker.JPG

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#4 2009-03-25 14:22:38

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

That would be much less painful than what I usually use as a "poker." big_smile


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#5 2009-03-25 14:30:49

madoherty
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Registered: 2008-03-15
Posts: 366

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

I will admit that it tastes much better.

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#6 2009-10-23 10:04:35

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
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Posts: 529
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Just thought I would post for those that like to BBQ.  I watched a cooking show last week about smoking foods in different ways.  In the US we usually associate smoked foods with hard wood smoke.  This guy, though, smoked a duck using raw rice (white I believe), black tea, cinnamon sticks, and star anise.  I have all of the above, excluding the anise.  I may try it this weekend.  Really sounds good.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#7 2009-10-23 15:29:03

Karmajampa
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From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Replace anise with fennel.

Kel.

lowonthetotem wrote:

Just thought I would post for those that like to BBQ.  I watched a cooking show last week about smoking foods in different ways.  In the US we usually associate smoked foods with hard wood smoke.  This guy, though, smoked a duck using raw rice (white I believe), black tea, cinnamon sticks, and star anise.  I have all of the above, excluding the anise.  I may try it this weekend.  Really sounds good.


Kia Kaha !

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#8 2009-10-23 20:20:32

Tairaku 太楽
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From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3222
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

lowonthetotem wrote:

Just thought I would post for those that like to BBQ.  I watched a cooking show last week about smoking foods in different ways.  In the US we usually associate smoked foods with hard wood smoke.  This guy, though, smoked a duck using raw rice (white I believe), black tea, cinnamon sticks, and star anise.  I have all of the above, excluding the anise.  I may try it this weekend.  Really sounds good.

What is the heat source?


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#9 2009-10-23 23:32:04

edosan
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From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Tairaku wrote:

What is the heat source?

The duck is cooked (usually steamed) before being smoked, which is generally done in a wok, placing the duck on crossed chopsticks or a metal grid in the wok, with the smokin' ingredients in the bottom of the wok, which is covered and heated with the usual heat source.

Here are a coupla similar recipes detailing the procedure. I've tried this several times, and it's excellent:

       http://chinesefood.about.com/od/poultry … edduck.htm

       http://www.recipelink.com/cookbooks/200 … 922_3.html


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#10 2009-10-24 00:21:09

Tairaku 太楽
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From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

OK I have a wok burner on my stove, I'll check this out in coming weeks.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#11 2009-10-24 01:35:05

edosan
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From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Tairaku wrote:

OK I have a wok burner on my stove, I'll check this out in coming weeks.

You don't need massive heat to get the smoke going; it's a more subtle effect than gaijin smokin'...gives nice color, too.


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#12 2009-10-26 09:27:31

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

The duck is cooked (usually steamed) before being smoked

This is plain BBQ heresy, and you'll burn in BBQ hell for even suggesting it. :p  I never pre-cook or par-boil anything before smoking.  However, from my experience, boiling the meat first makes it soak up flavors more readily than other methods.

The heat that I generally use is hot coals.  I usually start coals in a chimney and only add them after they are all white and not producing any smoke.  Then I add what ever wood I want to use to flavor the meat in question.

Being the last minute Larry that I am, I had to settle for a young turkey, as that was all the market had fresh.  I brined it for about an hour in a salt, sugar, and cherry juice mixture breast down.  I mixed lemon zest, ginger, onion powder, garlic powder, red pepper, some curry powder, salt, cilantro, and black pepper into soft unsalted butter and put that under the skin of the bird.  I used cinamon sticks and black tea soaked in water for the smoke.  It was very flavorful.  I stuffed the bird with apple and asian pear.  The cinamon that I get is thin, so it was better to put a grate over the coals and then put the sticks and tea on that.  They just burned up too quickly when placed directly on the coals.

I am not a big fan of licorice, so I didn't mind leaving out the anise/fennel.

I like smoked tofu.  I think cinamon or tea will work well for that.  Hickory and even misquite have proven to be a little too strong for that application.  Fruit woods like apple and orange are better, but still rather "woody" for the delicate texture of tofu, although it is somewhat less delicate after drying for a while in the smoker.


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#13 2009-10-26 10:42:09

edosan
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From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

lowonthetotem wrote:

The duck is cooked (usually steamed) before being smoked

This is plain BBQ heresy...

Could be, but it's also Chinese cookin', not ham-handed 'Murrican BBQ (which I also love dearly).


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#14 2009-10-26 11:28:59

Karmajampa
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From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Worth checking out, 'Raz Al Hannud', could be mis-spelt, a Moroccan mix of herbs and spices, up to 35, and translates as " The Best of the Best.
I use it in Tajine cooking, in my own thrown tajine, which is 'cooking in steam', not as dry as BBQ but very versatile and open to broad creative explorations.

Kel.


Kia Kaha !

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#15 2009-10-26 21:26:06

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Karmajampa wrote:

Worth checking out, 'Raz Al Hannud', could be mis-spelt, a Moroccan mix of herbs and spices, up to 35, and translates as " The Best of the Best.
I use it in Tajine cooking, in my own thrown tajine, which is 'cooking in steam', not as dry as BBQ but very versatile and open to broad creative explorations.

Kel.

Properly done BBQ ain't dry. Ever. Even prior to sauce application.

Last edited by edosan (2009-10-26 21:28:49)


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#16 2009-10-31 09:13:44

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

but it's also Chinese cookin'

Please, China is so big that trying to nail down "Chineese cookin'" is like trying to nail butter to the wall.  Still, pre-cooking does seem to be popular in Chineese restaurants.  I think they even pre-cook those tasty spare ribs before smoking them.

Properly done BBQ ain't dry.

It really depends on what you meean by BBQ.  Some folks consider it a method of cooking, in which case some things can get dry, like vegetables and even some meats.  But, where I am from, me and all the other ignorant southern rednecks are usually referring to pulled pork when we talk about BBQ as a dish.  That should certainly not be dry, even before the sauce as you say.  A pork shoulder is a cut that can really take alot of abuse and still stay moist inside.  It has a high fat content and a bone through the center to help the inexperienced smoker.  I highly recommend the vinegar based sauces for this dish, but that is because I am from the south.  Folks in the mid west seem to prefer a more tomatoey BBQ sauce.  Ribs are harder to keep from drying out.  I usually rub them, smoke them, and then wrap them in foil , add sauce, and finish them that way (which is also BBQ heresy).  Purists would finish them one the smoker/grill uncovered, in which case they can get somewhat dry and chewey, but not DRY and TOUGH.  Fall off the bone ribs are not everyone's bag.

The turkey was excellent, but I was curious to know what the cinamon smoke would taste like on meat with a little more character (heritage turkeys are not really readily available around here.  The ones we get a pretty bland), so I bought a lamb shank this morning (still too last minute to get a duck and thaw it).  Asian lamb, hmmmm...

I have some 5 spice powder for rub.  I also found some star anise at the same store, so I'll give that a shot too.  It seems like an incongruous marriage of meat, spice, and smoke, but nothing ventured, nothing gained.  We will see.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#17 2009-11-03 08:28:35

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Lamb shanks were excellent and only took about 2.5-3 hours.  Of course it sat in rub for 48 hours.  Time always helps.

Last edited by lowonthetotem (2009-11-03 08:28:51)


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#18 2009-11-07 08:51:07

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

The grocery had spare ribs and Boston butts on sale, so I got one of each.  The butt is a smaller cut than I used to, usually using the whole picnic/shoulder.  It will be your classic Carolina style pulled pork.

The rids are rubbed in brown sugar, coco, five spice powder, and lots of cheyenne.  I am going for a sweet/bitter/hot as hell thing.  Going to finish them in a sauce made with a pomegranet juice base.

Using hickory and star anise for smoke.  I hate licorice, but when it's burned that anise takes on a whole new personality.

The dog needs a bath, but besides that it's nothing but shakuhachi practice and bbq smoke for the rest of the day.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#19 2009-11-07 10:39:02

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

lowonthetotem wrote:

The dog needs a bath, but besides that it's nothing but shakuhachi practice and bbq smoke for the rest of the day.

Sounds like a damned good day, even with the dog bath smile


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#20 2010-09-07 09:00:00

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
Website

Re: Shakuhachi BBQ

Smoked chicken this weekend using soaked black cardamon for smoke.  Good times were had by all, except the chicken, although she was feeling no pain.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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