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#1 2009-08-24 17:32:02

Josh
PhD
From: Grand Island, NY/Nara, Japan
Registered: 2005-11-14
Posts: 305
Website

Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Mejiro has posted a translation we did together of an article on Yokoyama Katsuya. It is from the Hogaku Journal.

http://www.mejiro-japan.com/system/index_e.php

(It is not the entire, and at times the most literal, translation but I am working on the full translation now. I'll post it on my website later and let everyone know when)

....and yes, he mentions the jinashi...smile

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#2 2009-08-24 20:21:50

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Thanks, Josh.

The PDF on shakuhachi making just below the Yokoyama interview also looks good. Here's a direct download link to that file:

       http://www.mejiro-japan.com/html/shaku_making2009.pdf


And just for good measure, here's a direct download link to the interview with Yokoyama-sensei:

       http://www.mejiro-japan.com/html/yk_article2009.pdf


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#3 2009-08-24 20:50:54

Yungflutes
Flutemaker/Performer
From: New York City
Registered: 2005-10-08
Posts: 1040
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Josh wrote:

Mejiro has posted a translation we did together of an article on Yokoyama Katsuya. It is from the Hogaku Journal.

http://www.mejiro-japan.com/system/index_e.php

(It is not the entire, and at times the most literal, translation but I am working on the full translation now. I'll post it on my website later and let everyone know when)

....and yes, he mentions the jinashi...smile

Beautiful work Josh. Hats off to you and Saori (?) for the translation.
What a mind blowing statement about Watazumi and Jinashi.

a deep bow, Perry


"A hot dog is not an animal." - Jet Yung

My Blog/Website on the art of shakuhachi...and parenting.
How to make an Urban Shakuhachi (PVC)

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#4 2009-08-24 20:55:09

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3207
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Josh wrote:

....and yes, he mentions the jinashi...smile

Very good interview and thanks for that Josh. But I didn't see the part about jinashi. wink


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#5 2009-08-24 21:15:34

Kerry
Member
From: Nashville, TN
Registered: 2005-10-10
Posts: 183

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Tairaku wrote:

Josh wrote:

....and yes, he mentions the jinashi...smile

Very good interview and thanks for that Josh. But I didn't see the part about jinashi. wink

Page 3, question, "Have you reached there yet?" smile

Last edited by Kerry (2009-08-24 21:16:26)


The temple bell stops, but the sound keeps coming out of the flowers. -Basho

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#6 2009-08-24 23:06:18

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3207
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Kerry wrote:

Tairaku wrote:

Josh wrote:

....and yes, he mentions the jinashi...smile

Very good interview and thanks for that Josh. But I didn't see the part about jinashi. wink

Page 3, question, "Have you reached there yet?" smile

Don't know how I missed that.........fascinating.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#7 2009-08-25 08:13:40

BrianP
Member
From: Ocala, FL
Registered: 2006-11-03
Posts: 289
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

I really enjoyed the read very much.  Thanks Josh!  I look forward to reading the full translation.

Thank you again!
Brian


The Florida Shakuhachi Camp
http://www.floridashakuhachi.com
Brian's Shakuhachi Blog
http://gaijinkomuso.blogspot.com

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#8 2009-08-25 14:53:22

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 917
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Excellent excerpt!
Yes, the jinashi quote from the interview is interesting!
I had heard this before - although my source was only secondary. Apparently Yokoyama had told Okuda on several occasions that he wanted to play jinashi when he retired. It is, however, much nicer to read it coming from himself. It has a very different feel - or authority I could perhaps even say.
It is also interesting that Furuya told me in Bisei 2007 that he would like to devote some time to play jinashi after retirement...
Aren't we all lovers of Watazumi! smile

One thing from this interview that really impressed me deeply is Yokoyam's devotion and 'love' to Watazumi. It is a very touching to read - and something I will try to keep in mind!
Thanks, Josh!


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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#9 2009-08-25 20:49:57

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3207
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

The main points which grabbed my imagination from this interview were:

1. That he felt the need to promote honkyoku in Japan because he thought there were too many shakuhachi players who don't play it.

2. The shakuhachi is destined to internationalize, but he wants the epicenter of that to remain Japan.

3. Gaijin players sound "involuntarily different".

4. Even in Japan there are not many people who play honkyoku well.

5. He never achieved his ultimate goal which was to play jinashi honkyoku.

My comments on these points from my "Western" perspective are:

1. In the West honkyoku is the main practice of most shakuhachi players.

2. Sure, because most of the best players are there. But who knows what will happen in the future? Martial arts and Zen studies in the West have eclipsed those in Japan.

3. Do they? I wonder if he (or anyone) did a "blind test" they'd be able to identify the race of a player. Some would be obviously Japanese because there are no Westerners who play that well, but is it possible to differentiate a fair to middling Japanese from Westerner? Interesting topic.

4. He admits that he was stunned by Watazumi, so the question is how will these great players develop if the teachers are not there and if people can't absorb the knowledge before the Watazumis and Yokoyamas of the world pass on? My opinion is that the future Watazumis can't develop simply by studying and imitating the existing practice. They have to add something else and raise the bar. Otherwise deterioration will be the norm.

5. Very provocative statement. It contradicts much of the "Yokoyama says.....Yokoyama told me.......Yokoyama did this......." stuff that has been circulated. At least it shows that he thought of jinashi as distinct from other shakuhachi practice.

Anyway a lot of Western players are living these ideals by playing mostly honkyoku and/or playing jinashi.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#10 2009-08-26 09:03:48

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Zen studies in the West have eclipsed those in Japan.

Zen studies progress without much influence, qualitatively, on Zen.  This sounds like the "My Zen is better than your Zen," crap I thought we should be trying to avoid.  I'm just sayin'. ;P

Considering he is Japanese, it shouldn't be surprising that Yokoyama would discover some special quality of Japaness.  The country has a reputation for such beliefs.  Whether we in the west accept these walls, or maybe gates is a better word, that is up to us individually.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#11 2009-08-26 09:37:25

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 917
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Josh, there is a question in the interview that is phrased:

'Your achievement to have developed the shakuhachi koten honkyoku is a big contribution'.

Do you have an idea what exactly the interviewer/or the translator means by 'koten honkyoku' and by 'to have developed'?

Just curious - hope that is ok smile Nothing negative.

BTW, who did the original interview?


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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#12 2009-08-26 11:21:54

lowonthetotem
Member
From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Yokoyama produced a series of scores, recordings, and playing notes and commentaries in a collection that is entitled "Koten Honkyoku," in which "Koten" I believe is to be translated as "classical" or "classic."  I think it may be important to note that the series was translated fully into English, so eventhough we Gaijin may play differently than the Japanese, Yokoyama still hoped to capitalize on our interest in shakuhachi as well as provide us with some instruction.

It is my reading that the question is directed towards this specific published collection.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#13 2009-08-26 11:30:47

math_ferreira
Member
From: São Paulo, Brazil
Registered: 2009-08-09
Posts: 33
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

That interview is very beautiful and moving!!!! Thanks so much for posting it!


Sound & Silence

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#14 2009-08-26 11:34:13

lowonthetotem
Member
From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

3. Gaijin players sound "involuntarily different".

Going back to the question that spurred this statement, I wonder if this really is just an example of good ol' Japanese ethnocentrism or something different.  I came to shakuhachi without any real background in music.  Perhaps Yokoyama is talking about musicians steeped in the western musical traditions who are drawn to shakuhachi, or Japanese music in general.  They are obviously bringing along some baggage from their western tradition.  This could very possibly be the reason why Yokoyama is concerned that folks were/are not playing honkyoku, tending to lean more toward more folk music with its more rhythmic qualities, which tend to be closer to a Gaijin idea of what a "song" is.  I've heard other folks talk about this.  It is not such a foreign or offensive concept in that light, I think.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#15 2009-08-26 13:11:33

Josh
PhD
From: Grand Island, NY/Nara, Japan
Registered: 2005-11-14
Posts: 305
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Hi,
Kiku, I think they were not directly referring to any CD compilation that Yokoyama did, as suggested, but more in a general sense of honkyoku. By "develop" I get the feeling they are talking more about  spreading his honkyoku and popularizing it. Although, it could possibly be a subconcious way of saying, because you are using jiari when you learned the pieces from a jinashi master, you have developed it. Even saying the shakuhachi has developed over time, ie. improved, with the use of ji and what not, can be a somewhat biased way of looking at the changes of the instrument.
Along those lines I also find it interesting that Yokoyama and Furuya need to wait until they retire to play more jinashi shakuhachi.

Involuntarily different, I think all players sound involuntarily different. As does the human voice regardless of ethnicity.
But if we look at it as similar to the pronunciation of a language, yes it takes time to develop a natural accent. Developing your listening skills develops your speach and intonation. Possibly the same for playing the shakuhachi. I have a feeling Tairaku is right though, a beginning Japanese player's ears are no more trained than a westerners so I doubt we could distinguish between the two.

By the way, the interview was conducted by the editor Tanaka Takafumi.

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#16 2009-08-26 13:28:18

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 917
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Josh wrote:

Kiku, I think they were not directly referring to any CD compilation that Yokoyama did, as suggested, but more in a general sense of honkyoku.

Yes, that was what I sensed. But using the more general meaning of the word rather than just referring to the notation of the KSK is a big mouthful, and a little ambiguous to understand (at least for me) - so I was just curious what it had said in Japanese or what you thought it meant smile Thanks!

Josh wrote:

By "develop" I get the feeling they are talking more about  spreading his honkyoku and popularizing it.

Oh my God - yes - he certainly did that! And being very successful and creative !

Josh wrote:

Although, it could possibly be a subconcious way of saying, because you are using jiari when you learned the pieces from a jinashi master, you have developed it. Even saying the shakuhachi has developed over time, ie. improved, with the use of ji and what not, can be a somewhat biased way of looking at the changes of the instrument.

Never mind ji or not ji - but the fact that Yokoyama has created a very new sound for honkyoku playing that attracted so many followers is a big achievement. So many got to know the shakuhachi through him and were attracted to his performance style.

Josh wrote:

Along those lines I also find it interesting that Yokoyama and Furuya need to wait until they retire to play more jinashi shakuhachi.

I think one could say they belong to another generation where jinashi was not an instrument of professionals but of eccentrics like Watazumi. Perhaps a few have played jinashi if they used long flutes - but which was not the norm either. The new generation of players the past decade or so has a very different attitude. But I am guessing here and would like to dig more into that one day (post 30 Sept).

Josh wrote:

By the way, the interview was conducted by the editor Tanaka Takafumi.

Yeah, I love that man - especially after watching him on YouTube! wink

Last edited by Kiku Day (2009-08-26 13:35:56)


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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#17 2009-08-26 15:42:20

nyokai
shihan
From: Portland, ME
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 613
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Traditional shakuhachi music is made up of lots of tiny stylistic details and nuances as well as rhythmic subtleties. I think that these details in some ways reflect the parent culture -- the language rhythms and common voiced gestures as well as the overall aesthetic. It is not unreasonable to assume that traditional Japanese music might be played with a non-Japanese "accent."

On another note, I have been listening a lot recently to the Yokoyama 2-CD set Zen. It struck me all over again: what a great player, what a unique voice.

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#18 2009-08-26 16:36:39

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3207
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

lowonthetotem wrote:

Zen studies in the West have eclipsed those in Japan.

Zen studies progress without much influence, qualitatively, on Zen.  This sounds like the "My Zen is better than your Zen," crap I thought we should be trying to avoid.  I'm just sayin'. ;P

Yes.......entering treacherous waters here wink To clarify, I did not mean "eclipse" in terms of quality........just that more people are doing it outside Japan than in Japan. Numbers. It will be a long time before that happens with shakuhachi, if ever.

Josh wrote:

Along those lines I also find it interesting that Yokoyama and Furuya need to wait until they retire to play more jinashi shakuhachi.

.

Sounds like they might be saying that jiari is a "professional" way to approach shakuhachi and they need it for their work, whereas when that's no longer an issue, they'll play jinashi. Performance vs. just playing.

lowonthetotem wrote:

3. Gaijin players sound "involuntarily different".

Going back to the question that spurred this statement, I wonder if this really is just an example of good ol' Japanese ethnocentrism or something different.  I came to shakuhachi without any real background in music.  Perhaps Yokoyama is talking about musicians steeped in the western musical traditions who are drawn to shakuhachi, or Japanese music in general.  They are obviously bringing along some baggage from their western tradition.

Except that Japanese players also carry baggage from Western musical concepts because they are much more familiar with Western music than traditional Japanese music. A guy like Yokoyama might be somewhat different because he grew up in a family where traditional music was played and he's of a previous generation. But most young people in Japan coming to shakuhachi would probably be coming from piano or other western instruments.

Chikuzen told me he recently had some arguments with Japanese players (Yokoyama students in fact) who insisted that tsu meri was Eb and u was Ab, etc. whereas Chikuzen wanted the lower traditional pitches. That's funny and spins this theory on its head.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#19 2009-08-26 18:01:47

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Tairaku wrote:

Chikuzen told me he recently had some arguments with Japanese players (Yokoyama students in fact) who insisted that tsu meri was Eb and u was Ab, etc. whereas Chikuzen wanted the lower traditional pitches. That's funny and spins this theory on its head.

Oh, Chikuzen's just stuck in his old-fashioned ways...... smile


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#20 2009-08-26 18:25:30

madoherty
Moderator
Registered: 2008-03-15
Posts: 362

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

nyokai wrote:

Traditional shakuhachi music is made up of lots of tiny stylistic details and nuances as well as rhythmic subtleties. I think that these details in some ways reflect the parent culture -- the language rhythms and common voiced gestures as well as the overall aesthetic. It is not unreasonable to assume that traditional Japanese music might be played with a non-Japanese "accent."

I really like your thinking on this Nyokai.  I had a conversation with an Armenian composer who expressed a similar sentiment with an Armenian folk instrument - one needs to learn the language in order to play it correctly.  The idea of accents is a nice middle-path approach.

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#21 2009-08-26 18:51:22

Josh
PhD
From: Grand Island, NY/Nara, Japan
Registered: 2005-11-14
Posts: 305
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

I have had more time to spend on the translation and better understand his nuances. For example, the "involuntary" part was not in the actual quote, that was something others had added to soften the blow to our western ears..   I posted the full article on my website:
http://joshu-an.com/blog/?cat=3

I have also been writing a monthly essay for the Nara International Film Festival entitled "Shakuhachi and the Culture of Nara."  If you are interested in reading those they are also posted there, in English and Japanese, take yur pick!wink

Time permitting I'll try to periodically post some recent articles and interviews of interest to the foreign community.

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#22 2009-08-26 22:19:32

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3207
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Great stuff Josh, new translation sounds a bit more natural. It's great to read someone of Yokoyama's stature speaking so candidly about many things.

I think the original translation said "I wish I had performed more" and this one says "feel pretty stupid" about not performing more during the last 10 years prior to the stroke. Very moving and open.

Sounds a bit down on the gaijin players, but he'll license them anyway! wink This echoes the interminable 60's debate "Can the white man play the blues?" In the end it didn't matter because the black man doesn't even want to play blues anymore.

When he says there is "almost no one" who he can leave the honkyoku with, Watazumi said the same thing except he said "no one". I think all of us can agree with Yokoyama that daily practice is a must. I also like when he said modern players don't have a sense of purpose and that he'd like to ask all "professionals" what their standards are. I wish he would have elaborated on that a bit more. It would be interesting to know what he thinks the standards should be.

I wonder about the difference between Japan and the West. In Japan there is the possibility to be a "professional" shakuhachi player, in other words make your living at it. In the West almost nobody does. How does this affect the way people approach shakuhachi and alter their standards?

Anyway Josh that's great stuff and by all means post more things like this as you come up with them. This is the kind of thing that makes the forum worthwhile.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#23 2009-08-27 01:27:30

Josh
PhD
From: Grand Island, NY/Nara, Japan
Registered: 2005-11-14
Posts: 305
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

If you take it line by line you could nit pick all of the nationalistic comments he makes. But in the end I get the feeling he is more trying to motivate Japanese people (the intended audience of the interview afterall) to appreciate honkyoku more. With all of his training and focus on honkyoku I think he definately believes that this is an essential aspect to a so-called professional's repertoirre. In his eyes it's almost as if he is saying that I wouldn't consider you a professional if you didn't take the honkyoku seriously.
He is very candid and pretty straight to the point about his opinions, one of the things I hope I could better capture in the full translation.

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#24 2009-08-27 11:00:11

chikuzen
Dai Shihan/Dokyoku
From: Cleveland Heights,OH 44118
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 401
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Nyokai wrote:

Traditional shakuhachi music is made up of lots of tiny stylistic details and nuances as well as rhythmic subtleties. I think that these details in some ways reflect the parent culture -- the language rhythms and common voiced gestures as well as the overall aesthetic. It is not unreasonable to assume that traditional Japanese music might be played with a non-Japanese "accent."

.
         This is seen easily from the viewpoint that early shakuhachi playing was an imitation of chanting.  One has to go back and look at what the earliest influences on shakuhachi playing were or where the early players developed their "ways of dealing with sound". The answer is in chanting and meditation.  The songs with Buddhists concepts in their titles are the ones influenced by chanting. Look at the way they were written. The early written music had no rhythm marks, just as chants don't as the pace is set by the chant leader; the symbols on the page inherently have nothing to do with music but are rather, only directions on how to make a certain sound, i.e., Ro means , "close all the holes" not that it is the pitch of D. What's on the page is only "directions" telling us what to do in order to make a certain sound. It deals with the mechanics only.  Kyorei is the easiest example to understand of this. Like a sutra, it has a beginning and an end; a certain pace but it's not fixed; the pitches are not fixed when someone chants rather, people chant at a sound range that best enables them to have sonic gratification inwardly. Monks were not "musicians" and still are not to be confused with "musicians". What is happening when someone chants what is written on the page, the person looks at and reads the character on the page, being able to read the character means that you know how to voice the sounds appropriately to pronounce the word or the character. Thus, the character is very much like "playing" Ro, Tsu, Re, Chi, Ri in that having it written in the page means it is giving us directions on how to make certain sounds. We know how to do this because we know how to talk and construct these sounds and also because we learned how to read the characters. So, it's a good perspective to understand that the shakuhachi replaced the voice and is doing the "talking". Knowledge of how to "voice" the sounds developed directly from their sense of chanting. Again, shomyo chanting shows a great influence on shakuhachi. Listen to how the sounds are bent up and down, how the chants start and end, etc.  The interesting thing about early shakuhachi that carried over is that the early scores had nothing to say about breathing (a breath mark is the end of the breath; wow; lots of info); and it had nothing to say about music. Only how to make sounds.  Monks are used to meditating and following the breath, taking care of the breath, so they really didn't need to write anything about that, just as in writing a sutra. So, think about what Yokoyama says about gaijin being involuntarily different. If you don't chant these songs and are not used to following the breath, then this influence is not going to show up in your shakuhachi playing. You shouldn't be surprised by a comment like that. I know without a doubt which of my students have chanted this stuff and how much, and when they are following the breath and when they aren't not (when they are reading the notes and doing mechanics but not following the breath changes alongside). So you know it's easy for him to understand this. You won't sound "japanese" with this element not influencing your shakuhachi music. Understanding this aspect of shakuhachi: the fact that the score mentions nothing about breath nor music, shows you what is NOT on the score. This means, that once you understand how to play the basic notes, you have to look elsewhere: go off the score to find answers. Thus, the tremendous frustration that people have with scores. If you expect something that's not there you get frustrated. At that point, scores are only good at creating questions, not answers. You have to go off the score to find the answers. Then, you look to the breathing aspects and the musical aspects. A breath doesn't do justice to what breathing is, nor does it teach you how to follow the breath from it's beginning, thru all it's permutations until it reaches it's end out the other side of the flute. Nor does the score mention anything about "linking" up two notes. The link is a real entity, just as much as the notes. You have to focus on this. And the link is the breath. This is what you have to focus on to learn how to practice honkyoku. Ths is probably the most important point for teaching yourself how to practice. Just playing the riff over and over is no going to come close. The link is the key. Start at the top of the page, look at the first note. Nothing is automatic with shakuhachi so we have to create this note. Then look at the second note and crate it. Then what? You have to link up these two notes. These are best thought as to be two very different notes and usually are. Creating the link is our job. This means paying attention to the breath and the changes needed in it at the same time as performing the mechanical changes (finger positions, head position, tongue position, etc). The, you have to link the 2nd & 3rd notes. Then the 3rd & 4th, ad on and on. Leave no stone unturned. If you do this, it 'll teach you how to practice shakuhachi. Here's where you can find answers, but it's not on he page! Try it. It's the tip of a big iceberg.

   This was long winded and I usually don't teach on the forum like this. However, if you don't understand the context that Yokoyama Katuya is speaking from, you'll be second guessing him all the way. He had a lot of gaijin come through taking one or two lessons during their trip through Japan. One of the biggest influences on their shakuhachi music was from the music of the country they came from. He also had a few gaijin come through who took lessons longer. However, he's basing his comments on the fact that there is usually little influence of chanting and meditation in their honkyoku music. It can't be hidden. I have stressed this to my students and others many times when they make comments about someone not sounding Japanese. The big point here too is that in your practice you should do what is necessary to play honkyoku like it originally was if you want to sound more that way. Chanting the songs, paying attention to the breath ALL the time (not just when inhaling), and stressng the linking of notes to determine what to practice will be a great start to effect your playing.

Last edited by chikuzen (2009-08-27 11:14:28)


Michael Chikuzen Gould

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#25 2009-08-27 11:58:19

ABRAXAS
Member
Registered: 2009-01-17
Posts: 353

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Chikuzen, what a fantastic post.

And what a fantastic thread.

I love this forum.


"Shakuhachi music stirs up both gods and demons." -- Ikkyu.

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