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#26 2009-08-27 17:02:41

Karmajampa
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From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Was it Yokoyama who proposed the next World Shakuhachi Festival to be in Kyoto in 2012 ?
(during the Sydney Harbour cruise 2008)

Kel.


Kia Kaha !

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#27 2009-08-27 17:17:17

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Karmajampa wrote:

Was it Yokoyama who proposed the next World Shakuhachi Festival to be in Kyoto in 2012 ?
(during the Sydney Harbour cruise 2008)

Kel.

Yokoyama wasn't on that trip, as he is a prisoner of dialysis, among other things.

I believe it was Kurahashi Yodo (nee Kurahashi Yoshio).


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#28 2009-08-27 17:22:17

Nyogetsu
Kyu Dan Dai Shihan
From: NYC
Registered: 2005-10-10
Posts: 259
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Correct.


The magic's in the music and the music's in me...
"Do you believe in Magic"- The Lovin' Spoonful

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#29 2009-08-27 18:07:30

geni
Performer & Teacher
From: Boston MA
Registered: 2005-12-21
Posts: 830
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Awesome Michael!!!

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#30 2009-08-27 18:22:01

madoherty
Moderator
Registered: 2008-03-15
Posts: 366

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Thank you Michael.

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#31 2009-08-27 18:32:18

chikuzen
Dai Shihan/Dokyoku
From: Cleveland Heights,OH 44118
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 402
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

It had been planned out ahead, of course, before Kurahashi-san announced it.  Miyoshi Genzan and him are two of the leaders in hosting this. Interesting already as this means that Tozan players will be more prominent than they were before, amongst other things.


Michael Chikuzen Gould

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#32 2009-08-27 19:07:55

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3222
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

chikuzen wrote:

It had been planned out ahead, of course, before Kurahashi-san announced it.  Miyoshi Genzan and him are two of the leaders in hosting this. Interesting already as this means that Tozan players will be more prominent than they were before, amongst other things.

Hopefully being in Kyoto means more Myoan players as well.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#33 2009-08-28 05:27:39

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 922
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Chikuzen,
What a great post- Thank you!
Let me just ask you a question: If you link the fact that Yokoyama sees or hears a difference between the playing of a non-Japanese and Japanese players... what about the playing of all the millions of Japanese people who never chant or pay attension to the breath all way through as is necessary when playing shakuhachi? And what about the non-Japanese and for that sake Japanese flute players that begin to play shakuhachi? They are used to pay attension to their breath till the note disappears (and yes in shakuhachi music you need attension on the ´-
breath even when there is no sound more so than when you play the flute-but still).

You post just made me think... and as I have a heavy headache from editing DVD for 3 days - it might just be me who missed out on some points you have already made. If so, I apologise beforehand. smile


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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#34 2009-08-28 08:59:57

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Kiku Day wrote:

...what about the playing of all the millions of Japanese people who never chant or pay attension to the breath all way through as is necessary when playing shakuhachi?

Millions? Ya think? Really?


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#35 2009-08-28 09:08:33

lowonthetotem
Member
From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Except that Japanese players also carry baggage from Western musical concepts because they are much more familiar with Western music than traditional Japanese music.

There are interesting commentaries on this phenomenon in this book (suggested to me by Chikuzen a while back):

http://www.amazon.com/Form-Style-Tradit … 0870115103

I'm finished reading it if anyone wants it mailed to them.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#36 2009-08-28 09:09:08

Seth
Member
From: Scarsdale, NY
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 270

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Great interview.

My Israeli side was pleasantly surprised that out of all the singers in the world he called out Ofra Haza as one of his favorites.  I used to live down the street from her in Tel Aviv.  Small world. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2xNTzlF … re=related

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#37 2009-08-28 14:38:14

Karmajampa
Member
From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Coming on the tail of the "great read thesis" thread, the Yokoyama interview also touches on similar cultural changes.
His feelings about Honkyoku are interesting to me as he seems to imply this is something of the essence of the shakuhachi tradition, and this is what is predominant in western players interests.
and todays modern japanese are interested in Western cultural baggage.
I think this has to do with the human mind being curious about variation, and also about losing interest in repetitive experiences.
The baggage of our conditioning is what got us to where ever we are at this point, that can't be changed, it can be used or not, though my understanding of the practices of Buddha Dharma is to come to see the conditioning and to not be blindly subject to it. To engage with a different culture reflects my own.
Why am I drawn particularly to the Honkyoku 'style' ? Perhaps it is because it is quite different to the musical forms I have been conditioned with, that it also involves the raw breath very much as singing does and it allows for impulsive expression of the moments energies......and more.

The comment regarding how anyone coming to play 'november steps' after his rendition is now influenced by that rendition. That this could be something of a hindrance !
and I like to make a Honkyuko my own. And this does not belittle the honkyoku of any other, there is a maturity in this. The child beginner imitates until it understands the form enough to  shape it into its' own.

I think we are seeing new expressions of Honkyoku with the Shakuhachi being taken up outside japan.

Regarding traditions Jesus said, "Take up your bed and walk".

Kel.


Kia Kaha !

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#38 2009-08-29 10:57:23

chikuzen
Dai Shihan/Dokyoku
From: Cleveland Heights,OH 44118
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 402
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Kiku wrote:

Let me just ask you a question: If you link the fact that Yokoyama sees or hears a difference between the playing of a non-Japanese and Japanese players... what about the playing of all the millions of Japanese people who never chant or pay attension to the breath all way through as is necessary when playing shakuhachi? And what about the non-Japanese and for that sake Japanese flute players that begin to play shakuhachi? They are used to pay attension to their breath till the note disappears (and yes in shakuhachi music you need attension on the ´-
breath even when there is no sound more so than when you play the flute-but still)

.
          I got my confidence to say that I could see why Yokoyama sensei said what he said from my own experiences of observing my students playing and knowing the influences on them,  on what I observed at Yokoyama's dojo and on knowing him quite well. I was a bit more eager to comment on the possible why's of what he said which lead into my comments on playing and studying shakuhachi.  Of course, I can't know what's in his mind and can't speak for him. One must also remember that he is just one man, and what he considers to sound Japanese could be different than what some other Japanese players/teachers consider to sound Japanese. And it's always in context, which most of this interview isn't, since he doesn't support his comments with explanation or much dialogue.

   To answer your question about the group of Japanese people who start playing or have been playing a long time yet don't meditate and don't follow the breath. There are many influences on developing or learning a playing aesthetic.To list a few:
1. Hearing your own teacher and studying with them. Hearing the teacher chant the songs. This is where the beginners should benefit greatly.
2. Hearing others play.
3. Hearing people in Japan sing, especially older people like your grandparents when growing up. One can hear the influence of chanting in their voices. Asia was and still is full of Buddhism and the echo of the older pervasive influence of Buddhism is there. I think it is much easier to sound Japanese when playing shakuhachi then it would be to sing like an (older) Japanese person. Of course, I haven't done the training but neither do most Japanese people who are just singing out of love of a song. (And I wouldn't want to sound like a karaoke singer anyway with all that insipid vibrato).
3B. Cultural experiences: hearing people sing in a variety of situations: San Kyoku singing, Jiuta, Kouta,Hauta, Shigin, Rokyoku, Minyo, Noh theatre, monks chanting in temples, etc. etc. 
    I think there's a possibility that someone drawn to shakuhachi in Japan has been exposed to singing and/or chanting somewhere along the line. How much of an influence that is or will become later when they search for referneces for playing depends on the individual.  That fact is that in each of these singing "trades" talk of "correct breathing" is abundant. And the mechanics, the way the throat is used and the aesthetics are all very similar. I think if you grow up in a country where you find this style, it has an influence on you. Of course, Yokoyama is also referring to those japanese who would rather play modern or western sounding shakuahchi songs too when he "urges" people too study honkyoku more.

    I'm just drawing on experiences that one may have in Japan that we don't have outside of Japan, that could be influential. Instead of hearing this music, most of us hear something else growing up. This could easily account for the difference that Yokoyama hears.

  I have to mention that Mr. Yokoyama is such a mixed bag himself so it's interesting hearing him talk of honkyoku. He definitely is considered by many to not be a traditional player of honkyoku himself, unless you consider Watazumi traditional, which also seems quite a stretch. Watazumi was one of, if not the biggest influence on Yokoyama sensei's playing. Both were and are considered to be renegades in Japan by traditionalists of the Meian and Kinko worlds. In one viewpoint, they were very much products of their times with the influence of western music in their music. I find as much of an influence of Steve Lacy in Watazumi's playing as I do Meian influence. Interesting that they were such good friends too! Yokoyama sensei was raised in a Kinko environment, which his father played and taught to him. And his mother played koto and sang. So he also had the Japanese "musical" influence at home and later the western musical influence from his love of listening to western music. Watazumi learned in a Meian environment and then changed the music. He even played western instruments, and both have the influence of equal temperament scale in their playing, especially Yokoyama sensei. It's not surprising that he mentions western musicians in his interview. One part of the reason many foreigners find Yokoyama's music accessible and pleasing is because it's so melodic. (Especially his signature pieces, "Sanan" and "Tamuke"). If you compare many of the songs with the Meian versions they (Watazumi and Yokoyama) have pushed together notes from 2 or 3 and sometimes 4 breaths of a song and play them in one breath. This makes the melody easier to hear and brings out the "musicality". But it moves the style away from the original which is more chant like, where a lot of it was based.

  I mention this stuff not just because I like to ramble but because one realizes that Yokoyama Sensei was aware of traditional Japanese music and non-Japanese music. So maybe he hears the influences of both easily when foreigners play. It's quite easy I think. As an example, when I hear Riley Lee play certain songs, I hear a great deal of his teacher and the Chikuho music and also the influence of Yokoyama. It's not hard to here the influences in someone's music if one knows what to listen for.

  As far as the comment about needing to pay attention to the inhalation even "more so", I take it that you chose to emphasize this due to the fact that many people pay attention to the sound production aspects of playing and neglect to focus on the inhalation? I think it's a good thing for a teacher to point out. Beginner's and even long term players are often way too focused on what's happening at the blowing edge and their minds never get around to what's happening with the mouth, throat, tongue, etc. But, I would also emphasize that exhalation and following it to the end is just as important.  If we take the Hara as the starting point of the exhalation, and the breath flowing out the end of the shakuhachi as the end of the exhalation of the breath, then everything that happens to the breath on this journey causes a change it in some way. The change in the breath results in a change in the sound. It's important to emphasis this point: that the changes in the sounds are a RESULT of the changes in the breath. So, it's very important to know what is happening to the breath as it flows during the exhalation. After one learns to read scores, the scores no longer provide any answers so we have to "go off the page" to find them. The page says nothing about the breath so that's a good place to learn. Especially practicing the links. That's a big key. In reading people's attempts to list what they do in practice I have never heard that emphasized. I wouldn't begin to know how to practice if I didn't pay attention to the breath all the way along it's exhalation journey. I DO think people pay more attention than they realize as they are aware of a need to effect changes in the breath sometimes, especially big changes, i.e. go from playing a big muraiki sound to a small meri sound. Pulling the smaller sound out of the bigger sound is an easy illustration of what I'm talking about. But a change exists with every transition, not just the big in your face ones. The result of this type of playing is the appearance of a certain general "experiential awareness" level but not the higher specific "conscious playing" level that you'll get from following the breath the whole time thru the linking of each note and on to the phrasing. The more one follows the breath the more one can become consciously active in the playing and through the awareness learn more where to go to find the answers they seek. Answers can also be found in other places, especially by studying with a teacher that can guide you or through an immense amount of listening to the song. Like in any field, this is really the "tip of the iceberg" since it moves towards a more and more self referential activity.
        x

Last edited by chikuzen (2009-08-29 13:07:54)


Michael Chikuzen Gould

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#39 2009-08-29 15:33:15

Nyogetsu
Kyu Dan Dai Shihan
From: NYC
Registered: 2005-10-10
Posts: 259
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

I find Chikuzen's comments to be "spot-on".
This is particularly true in two areas:

1- The importance of singing or chanting the music. Yokoyama-Sensei is a master at this, and used to lead almost annual Workshops in NYC with me and my students back in the 70's and 80's with a greeat deal of emphasis on the singing/chanting. Another great proponent of the singing/chanting was Yamaguchi Goro. He once said to me, "If you can sing it, you can play it." Its a type of accustoming the inner-ear to be able to "hear" a line of music (Honkyoku or Gaikyoku) internally ; that is, without even playing it.

2-Another point that I agree with is how much our playing is influenced by our teachers. Kurahashi Yoshio (son of Kurahashi Yodo) is a good example. After studying with Homei Matsumura (Yamaguchi Goro's top disciple) for 24 years , one can easily hear the mix of his father's teacher (Jin Nyodo) and Goro Sesnei in his playing. In my case, as his mother used to say, I sound completely like YODO Sensei (and by inference - the Jin Nyodo Style; that is, more breathy, and less pretty that Goro Sensei. (Needless to say, it a great honor for me to ever be discussed in the same conversation as Jin Nyodo or Yamaguchi Goro. Maybe , someday.......)


The magic's in the music and the music's in me...
"Do you believe in Magic"- The Lovin' Spoonful

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#40 2009-08-29 15:40:35

Karmajampa
Member
From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
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Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Nicely put Michael, thank you.
For myself, coming to the shakuhachi after exploring meditative practices such as 'Anapanasati', meditation on the ingoing and outgoing of the breath, blowing the bamboo is a wonderfully natural extension of that practice. and a beneficial precursor to Shakuhachi playing. As I feel other body work practices such as Yoga, Tai Chi and Karate arealso.
Interestingly my own breath is more prepared for shakuhachi blowing if I have sat in anapanasati practice first, or if I have practiced some Yoga asanas.
when I read that teachers recommend including Meditation and martial arts along with shakuhachi it makes obvious sense.
an Holistic practice.

Kel.


Kia Kaha !

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#41 2009-08-30 01:41:06

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 922
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Chikuzen,

Great post thank you for answering.
Note that I was not disagreeing with you - just curious.

I didn't mean Japanese people who have played for a long time and don't chant. I meant Japanese people who begin to play shakuhachi, who has not had the influence of much Buddhist music. During my upbringing in Japan and looking at my family and friends outside shakuhachi circles - Buddhist music is as far a concept as music in Tierra del Fuego. For many Japanese people, they don't even know what sankyoku is, and turn to another TV channel when Japanese music comes on (and most of the time when it is Japanese music in TV it is enka). That's what my grandmother used to do. The people I have met in Japan outside of shakuhachi circles, don't even really know what a shakuhachi is - they lean back and think and say..."It is an instrument, right?' Most Japanese of the younger generation I have met only know Japanese traditional music from jidaigeki or samurai films, they find totally uncool to watch. Now I have mentioned my friends and family - but this is also true from the research I have done and many of my colleagues have done. And that was why I asked the question.
It was very nice to observe that traditional music circles are getting more popular among school and university students when I did fieldwork in 2007. There is hope - but when I asked university students doing traditional music - most did what we would call 'Western music' on Japanese instruments and they often aswered 'I joined the circle because I didn't know anything about Japanese music'. But it is a very positive change from Japan in the 80s and 90s, I find.
Japan is unique in the way it so early Westernised its music educational system. There are other examples of that in Asia, and for example Turkey, who also did a through Westernisation of their music education did it much later in the 1920-30s. They have been extremely successful in Japan to have changed people's sensibility of music with the profound change in music education. That is why I question if it can be so true that just because of the genes - one plays differently. In that case, do I play half as differently or double as Japanese than other non-Japanese?

I can understand on you that you believe even the J-pop kids in Japan are influenced from Buddhist chanting. And perhaps you are right. I suppose it is like classical music in Europe today. Europe being the original lands of Western classical music. No symphony orchestra can survive without being sibsidised, only a small minority of young people listen to classical music - but you can still say that Europeans are influenced by its music tradition. And so are the Japanese - even they have had this abrubt change in music education in the 19th century.
Although - unknown to most people, Western classical music and pop music are great examples of transculturation.

There is no question about that a shakuhachi player will be influenced by the playing of his/her teacher - but that is true whether you are Japanese or not. As you mentioned yourself, yes Riley's playing has influences from both Chikuho and Yokoyama. That is for example why I never thought Iwamoto Yoshikazu sounds so much like Watazumi. The phrasing yes, but quite a few people who study jinashi shakuhachi come to me and can almost play Watazumi pieces exactly as Watazumi himself on a certain recording if one only listened to phrasing. But to me no-one sound like Watazumi - and the reason for it is that I hear the difference in the breathing. But again, that is also why I do question how much one can hear the difference in the playing of a non-Japanese person's playing when he/she has come further than the initial phase of learning a 'foreign' music tradition.

As of singing. Yes, singing is the best way to practice that is not playing. Singing is really the thing to do. I wish people would do this more. When I teach I try to make people sing the honkyoku pieces. But we have a weird relation to our voice in this part of the world and most get really shy. To avoid exposing people's shyness, I then sing the honkyoku for them because that is at least one thing they can take home - that if you can sing it - it you can play it.

As you can see, I do agree on what you wrote - but I was just curious about the non-Japanese and Japanese aspects. Obviously I will always be in the middle here and you know people not fitting nicely into little boxes or categories always ask dumb questions! smile

Last edited by Kiku Day (2009-08-30 01:44:06)


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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#42 2009-08-30 09:19:47

chikuzen
Dai Shihan/Dokyoku
From: Cleveland Heights,OH 44118
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 402
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Kiku, thanks for the talk about the younger people in Japan. You reminded me of that part of Japan which I certainly recognized when I lived there, but now I'm quite divorced from. Now I only include what I'm interested in in my memories. I'll be in Japan in Nov. for the first time in 8 years and will be reminded of many such things, I'm sure.

   I have a funny dream last night of Watazumi "mini me's" walking around playing real fat 1.6's, I guess thanks to your email.


Michael Chikuzen Gould

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#43 2009-08-30 11:23:20

Nyogetsu
Kyu Dan Dai Shihan
From: NYC
Registered: 2005-10-10
Posts: 259
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Imagine "the 7 Dwarfs" all being Watazumi Mini- me's walking around with Shakuhachi.
(Hi Ho, Hi Ho, its off to work we go !!)

Oh dear, I seem to have too much time on my hands this morning!


The magic's in the music and the music's in me...
"Do you believe in Magic"- The Lovin' Spoonful

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#44 2009-08-30 11:59:32

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 922
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

chikuzen wrote:

I have a funny dream last night of Watazumi "mini me's" walking around playing real fat 1.6's, I guess thanks to your email.

That's funny! I hope it was not because you felt uneasy with the questions I asked.

Yes, one can ignore the majority of Japan if you stay within shakuhachi circles. And I do the same to stay sane - but I am constantly reminded of the other Japan by family and also by the research on music in Japan. Some of the hip hop and underground music happening is really cool though!

Good luck with the trip to Japan. If I have my viva early November I have a vague plan to go to Japan as well. Could be fun to meet up there and with all the shakuhachi people from the forum in Japan! smile

Ronnie, it is nice when you have time to come with little comments!


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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#45 2009-08-30 13:59:54

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Jon wrote:

young Japanese men playing shakuhachi:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RFvvdHcUUM

Great find, Jon!  Those guys have studied; one of 'em even used a Ro-kari  smile


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#46 2009-08-30 14:14:57

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Probably doesn't belong on this thread, but here's a pretty nice shakuhachi solo rendition of Gekko Routeki (Fukuda Rando):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bTvBA1Y … re=related

Interesting to watch how the player works it.


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#47 2009-08-30 23:41:10

Daniel Ryudo
Shihan/Kinko Ryu
From: Kochi, Japan
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 355

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Thanks Josh, for the nice translation of Yokoyama's interview; it's also great to hear the different perspectives expressed on it by various people on the forum; Chikuzen's points on breath and chanting, Tairaku's reiteration of the need for daily practice, Nyokai's note of 'stylistic details' and 'rhythmic subtleties' ... I like the fact that Yokoyama sensei expresses his ideas and opinions quite candidly.  He definitely has a sense of mission in regard to preserving the honkyoku and passing them on; in his yearly workshops at Bisei he used to stress the necessity of both shugyo (thorough training/ practice) and kufu (ingenuity/invention) in regard to shakuhachi playing.

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#48 2009-08-30 23:47:24

chikuzen
Dai Shihan/Dokyoku
From: Cleveland Heights,OH 44118
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 402
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Thanks Ed for the link. I like his eyebrow movements!


Michael Chikuzen Gould

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#49 2009-08-31 00:11:05

chikuzen
Dai Shihan/Dokyoku
From: Cleveland Heights,OH 44118
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 402
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Kiku wrote:

That's funny! I hope it was not because you felt uneasy with the questions I asked.

Absolutely no problem Kiku. I didn't at all. Some questions lead to answers and some to more more questions. If they didn't lead somewhere, we just wouldn't/couldn't reply. Yours provoked thought, which made my lazy brain move even on a sunday, when I watch golf and blow RO, which is essentially the same thing, at least on the inhalation.

Last edited by chikuzen (2009-08-31 09:51:42)


Michael Chikuzen Gould

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#50 2009-08-31 01:16:57

Kiku Day
Shakuhachi player, teacher and ethnomusicologist
From: London, UK & Nørre Snede, DK
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 922
Website

Re: Yokoyama Katsuya Interview

Thanks Jon for the link on YouTube. Great fun! Of course these three guys are on YouTube. I forgot what they call the group but I have a CD of them somewhere. The whole CD is of them playing rock music like Purple Haze on 3 shakuhachi. It is fun - in some ways... As far as I know from the CD liner notes they began to study shakuhachi at university circles.

Good to hear, Chikuzen.


I am a hole in a flute
that the Christ's breath moves through
listen to this music
Hafiz

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