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Tube of delight!

#26 2010-09-15 14:10:31

Derek Van Choice
Member
From: Lake San Marcos, CA
Registered: 2005-10-21
Posts: 99
Website

Re: vintage alteration

Yungflutes wrote:

Looks like he's using mono filament? Doesn't seem authentic for that era. Thanks for the belly laugh Derek!

Ha... thanks Ed/Perry... yeah, that's rattan.  I'm always battling the little twisties & coils, despite several hours of pre-soaking, so I had to incorporate that element into the pic  smile.

Ironically, speaking of Neanderthals (though a distant era), I just planted some "Equisetum Hyemale" - http://www.floridata.com/ref/e/equi_hye.cfm also known has Horsetails or Scouring Rush.  It's been around a few hundred million years and was commonly used to scour utensils and polish fine furniture, given the high silica content.  I've been experimenting with it on bamboo and it does a surprisingly nice job of pre-polishing the root area.  Similar to a 1200-1500gr, I'm guessing?   Really a neat plant, and useful!

Ugh.

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#27 2010-09-15 15:57:27

Jim Thompson
Moderator
From: Santa Monica, California
Registered: 2007-11-28
Posts: 421

Re: vintage alteration

Derek Van Choice wrote:

Ironically, speaking of Neanderthals (though a distant era), I just planted some "Equisetum Hyemale" - http://www.floridata.com/ref/e/equi_hye.cfm also known has Horsetails or Scouring Rush.  It's been around a few hundred million years and was commonly used to scour utensils and polish fine furniture, given the high silica content.  I've been experimenting with it on bamboo and it does a surprisingly nice job of pre-polishing the root area.  Similar to a 1200-1500gr, I'm guessing?   Really a neat plant, and useful!

Ugh.

In the old days we used to use it for sanding reeds(sax, clarinet or whatever). They sold in the music stores in 2 inch lengths in little bottles. I wonder if they still do.  It grows by the roadside in many areas. I never knew they used it for all of that other stuff. You are taking me back in time with that one!


" Who do you trust , me or your own eyes?" - Groucho Marx

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#28 2010-09-15 17:16:39

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: vintage alteration

Word is, you can smoke it, too......


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#29 2010-09-15 18:31:07

Derek Van Choice
Member
From: Lake San Marcos, CA
Registered: 2005-10-21
Posts: 99
Website

Re: vintage alteration

Wow, you're right!  I just tried smoking some and it seeeems tou have a neaat    ffect on moy gubhrr lllbaa mrga nol moookienen aabag ofofjjje  w 432222   7.

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#30 2010-09-15 18:47:52

Moran from Planet X
Member
From: Here to There
Registered: 2005-10-11
Posts: 1524
Website

Re: vintage alteration

One mighty fine looking shakuhachi maker, there, Derek!


"I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass...and I am all out of bubblegum." Rowdy Piper, They Live!

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#31 2010-09-15 21:57:26

HarryHansen
Member
From: Hawaii
Registered: 2010-04-12
Posts: 245
Website

Re: vintage alteration

What would you do with this 1.6 Edo period flute?

I plan to bind the cracks externally to avoid cutting the bamboo at all, and clean the dirt off (carefully, so as not to disturb the wear and urushi coating).

For anything major, I'd send it to someone, but should I even have someone do any restoration, or just do as little as possible to make it playable?

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4153/4994268269_7ce41f3e15.jpg

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#32 2010-09-15 22:02:16

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3226
Website

Re: vintage alteration

It looks like the utaguchi is intact which is a good thing. All you need to do is close the split and bind it externally.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#33 2010-09-15 22:11:13

HarryHansen
Member
From: Hawaii
Registered: 2010-04-12
Posts: 245
Website

Re: vintage alteration

Tairaku 太楽 wrote:

It looks like the utaguchi is intact which is a good thing. All you need to do is close the split and bind it externally.

Thanks smile I have done a lot of bindings, and practice with it, but would it be unwise for me to at least do that myself? Can I damage it doing external bindings? (I have never damaged one yet doing it, but would hate to harm this one)
Yeah I'm really surprised the utaguchi is in such good shape. Here are more pictures if you're interested. http://www.flickr.com/photos/malaan/set … 841197015/

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#34 2010-09-15 22:25:43

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3226
Website

Re: vintage alteration

External bindings are not problematic, you can always take them off.

The kinds of repairs/alterations that need caution are things that change the nature of the flute, such as utaguchi angle, shape of the holes, opening up the bottom hole, and bore work.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#35 2010-09-16 04:39:28

HarryHansen
Member
From: Hawaii
Registered: 2010-04-12
Posts: 245
Website

Re: vintage alteration

Tairaku 太楽 wrote:

External bindings are not problematic, you can always take them off.

The kinds of repairs/alterations that need caution are things that change the nature of the flute, such as utaguchi angle, shape of the holes, opening up the bottom hole, and bore work.

I just wanted to share the results.. not sure if I should have started a new thread instead? I reckon this pertains to the current topic though, as I would call it a "relic".

I'm only posting a couple of pics here (small size) so as not to clog the thread, but if you're interested, the rest are here. http://www.flickr.com/photos/malaan/set … 841197015/

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4124/4995537048_b2248b8437_m.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4128/4995535974_176df03df5_m.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4152/4995535414_e6fd92ed75_m.jpg

Last edited by HarryHansen (2010-09-16 04:43:05)

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#36 2010-09-17 10:32:44

Toby
Shakuhachi Scientist
From: out somewhere circling the sun
Registered: 2008-03-15
Posts: 405

Re: vintage alteration

Greatest thing I ever found for final polishing is a boar's tusk. I was given a couple by woodcarvers in the Trobriand Islands in Papua New Guinea some years ago when I was there shooting a documentary--it is what they use for polishing. Rubbing it briskly over the roots and even the skin of the bamboo and utaguchi face brings up a lovely shine. Actually you can use any hard and smooth object that is rounded enough not to tear things up (but not so rounded that you can't apply enough pressure).

Toby

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#37 2010-09-17 23:44:44

Karmajampa
Member
From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
Website

Re: vintage alteration

Toby wrote:

Greatest thing I ever found for final polishing is a boar's tusk. I was given a couple by woodcarvers in the Trobriand Islands in Papua New Guinea some years ago when I was there shooting a documentary--it is what they use for polishing. Rubbing it briskly over the roots and even the skin of the bamboo and utaguchi face brings up a lovely shine. Actually you can use any hard and smooth object that is rounded enough not to tear things up (but not so rounded that you can't apply enough pressure).

Toby

This is probably 'burnishin'.

K


Kia Kaha !

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