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#1 2005-11-08 00:31:59

Travis Winegar
Member
From: Columbia, MO
Registered: 2005-10-31
Posts: 74
Website

What do you listen to?

Since this section of the forum is as of yet unused, I decided it was my duty to get rid of the zeros in the post count.

Since I assume we are all music fans, and not just shakuhachi fans, I think it would be very interesting to know what everyone listens to when you're not enjoying shakuhachi.

My tastes are fairly diverse (as I would guess is probably the case with most of you).  First and foremost on my list is Bjork.  She is a fantastic artist and songwriter, and marches to some mysterious drum that nobody has every seen before (I hold originatily in very high esteem, and Bjork is the Queen of being herself).

After Bjork comes a score of various artists and styles.  Certain metal bands have survived my transition from the 80's to present day.  Pantera and Iron Maiden are fine examples of them.

On the flip side, I very much enjoy listening to what MTV would have called Diva music a few years ago.  Artists like Sinead O'Connor, Mazzy Star, Brenda Khan, Edie Brickell, etc.

As a trumpet player, I developed a love for big band (Glen Miller and such) and solo trumpet players.  Maynerd Furgeson and JB Arban are two of my favorites.

And... that's about it for my daily listening.  I will occasionally break out something classical (Hector Berlioz's Symphony Fantastique is one of my favorites), but that is few and far between with my limited time these days.

So what do the rest of you listen to?


"As soon as you see something, you already start to intellectualize it. As soon as you intellectualize something, it is no longer what you saw." Shunryu Suzuki

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#2 2005-11-09 06:10:24

Moran from Planet X
Member
From: Here to There
Registered: 2005-10-11
Posts: 1524
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

Travis Winegar wrote:

So what do the rest of you listen to?

Lester Young. Lester Young with Billie Holiday. Lester Young with Count Basie. Lester Young with Nat King Cole. Lester Young in his prime. Lester Young when he was sick.

Bird.

Trumpeters Sweets Edison and, of course, 'Pops' (Louis Armstrong; particulary early-mid '30s recordings). Art Taum, Bud Powell and Monk. Django Reinhardt and, much later, Marc Ribot.

Harmonica player DeFord Bailey and later, Little Walter Jacobs.

Irish button accordion pioneer Joe Cooley, and later Billy McComiskey. Irish fluters Patsy Horan and Seamus Tansey.

Bob Dylan. Bob Dylan. And Bob Dylan.

Ben Harper.

Glenn Gould's Bach, Bizet, Brahms and Mozart.

Any authentic whale songs. (Really, I know it's corny, but the authentic ones put me in a similar space as listening to Watazumido.)

-----------------------------------------

And since none of the pros responded to my "5 shakuhachi CDs no one should be without" topic, I'll list my newcomer's 5 CD's that I couldn't live without in no particular order (I tend toward the Dokyoku and Meian):

MITSUHASHI KIFU - THE ART OF THE SHAKUHACHI Vol. I   (Magnificent versions of Choshi, Hifumi-Cho, Hachi-Gaeshi, normally considered "beginner's pieces," on different length jinashi instruments. Plus a rhapsodic 'Muju Shin Kyoku' which was Master Jin Nyodo's "defining" composition.) Available at shakuhachi.com or amazon.com.

YOKOYAMA KATSUYA - SHAKUHACHI KOTEN HONKYOKU-VOL. I & II Double CD (This is the most important CD in my budding collection as all pieces are played on a standard 1.8 and sheet music and playing guide are also available. The music is _not_ simple, nor simply performed, however. Yokoyama Katsuya is one of the great modern masters and synthesists of ancient and modern forms). Available at shakuhachi.com or shakuhachiyuu.com.

MASAYUKI KOGA - EAST WIND  (Koga is the first shakuhachi player I ever saw perform twenty-nine years ago and, man, did that set a high bar! He's a master of both Kinko and Tozan music and one of the most perfect flute players I have ever heard.) Available at shakuhachi.com or amazon.com.

YASUDA SHINPU - MUSIC OF THE SHAKUHACHI   (We've discussed this album on the "esron pipe" topic. Very pure old style Meian (Myoan) music played on diferent bass length jinashikan/hochiku instruments including plastic plumbing pipe.)
Mp3 downloads ($6.95 for the complete album + free pdf of the liner notes and original LP cover) available at: http://www.smithsonianglobalsound.org/c … itemid=707

(Monty Levenson has this in CD format :

"YASUDA SHINPU is a master of the shakuhachi and the larger hotchiku flutes. He studied Meian and Koten honkyoku with the esteemed teacher Kikusui Kofu. Shinpu plays with great sensitivity some of the longest shakuhachi made.
S-S8a. MUSIC OF THE SHAKUHACHI CD $18.50
A special reissue by Smithsonian-Folkways. Now on CD. An exceptional recording of Meian honkyoku. Complete with liner notes."

It is listed under the "S" category in RECORDINGS / CDs > Alphabetical Listing of Recorded Music  . . . Around the World at http://www.shakuhachi.com/)

WATAZUMIDO - HOCHIKU   http://www.bamboo-in.com/shop/CDs2.htm  ('Mysterious Sound of the Bamboo Flute', remastered, if 'Hochiku' is not available and if you can't get either because of expense --$40-$50 each-- or out-of-stock, then go to amazon.com or shakuhachi.com for "THE ART OF THE JAPANESE BAMBOO FLUTE" which is a collection of raw field recordings, only half of which are shakuhachi/hochiku recordings --Watazumi played all kinds of Japanese bamboo flutes. The recordings on THE ART OF THE JAPANESE BAMBOO FLUTE"  sound as if Watazumi's robes were flapping up against the microphone or the mic was a lapel mic attached to his robes. Some disconcerting sounds, but you'll get over them quickly because of Watazumi's subtle, powerful, hypnotic playing.)

Last edited by Chris Moran (2005-12-16 23:09:40)


"I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass...and I am all out of bubblegum." Rowdy Piper, They Live!

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#3 2005-11-16 01:55:45

saille
Member
From: Long Beach, CA
Registered: 2005-11-03
Posts: 16

Re: What do you listen to?

Thank you for the bibliography Chris--I found mention of Meian playing in one of my books, and I've been curious about it since most of what one hears/reads about seems to be 'other' (i.e. non-Meian).  Is this available as a CD, or only as a download?  (Here my ignorance shows--I suppose most people probably know how to burn a CD from a download . . . umm . . . er . . . )

It is also interesting reading what other shakuhachi-attracted people listen to apart from shakuhachi.  Travis, I don't even recognize half of what you listed!  Curioser and curioser . . .

For the last five years or so, prior to this newly-blossoming obsession with Asian flutes, I've pretty much listened to silence.  Whale-song aside, silence is what I was able to tolerate.  Before the period of silence I was a violinist, passionate about late Beethoven and pretty much all modern/20th century classical music.  The other musicians I played with though were not really interested in much beyond Haydn, which was an endless source of disappointment.  Favorite pieces for listening used to be the slow movement of Beethoven's triple concerto . . . the slow movement of his seventh symphony . . . all of his late quartets (130 & 131 especially) . . . Rachmaninoff's Isle of the Dead, and 2nd & 3rd concertos . . . Cage's pieces for "prepared piano" . . . Messeian's Quartet for the End of Time . . . all of Bartok (esp. the quartets) & Kodaly, and anything at all played by the Kronos Quartet, which I positively worshipped . . .

But then the silence hit, and I neither played nor listened.  The thing about Honkyoku, or what I've heard of it at least, is that it seems to acknowledge silence in a way that neither Western music nor even other Eastern music seems able to do.  So I can listen without trouble.  And, in fact, the silence sometimes seems to be amplified by the music.

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#4 2005-11-16 06:08:40

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3222
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

saille wrote:

But then the silence hit, and I neither played nor listened.  The thing about Honkyoku, or what I've heard of it at least, is that it seems to acknowledge silence in a way that neither Western music nor even other Eastern music seems able to do.  So I can listen without trouble.  And, in fact, the silence sometimes seems to be amplified by the music.

So much so that there is a specific term for the silence between honkyoku phrases, "Ma". The way the player uses "ma" is one of the main factors in the quality of his/her performance.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#5 2005-11-16 12:14:44

Mujitsu
Administrator/Flutemaker
From: San Francisco
Registered: 2005-10-05
Posts: 884
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

Thanks for getting rid of the zero's, Travis.

 

saille wrote:

Whale-song aside, silence is what I was able to tolerate.

I can appreciate your feeling, Saille. I live close to the beach. Most late afternoons, I go to sit, play and listen. I enjoy the "silence" or "Ma" of the seaside. It's interesting how much is going on within this silence. So much so, that by comparison, I am often flustered by sensation in a crowd.

While working, I can listen to Hank Williams over and over. Like shakuhachi, the music has such a terrible beauty.

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#6 2006-01-24 03:59:42

Bogert
Member
From: Amagasaki-shi, Hyogo-ken
Registered: 2005-12-05
Posts: 203

Re: What do you listen to?

Silence, probably my favorite sound besides shakuhachi.  That's why I don't really like the city, so full of noise, not the good kind of noise that comes from sitting silently in the middle of 'nowhere', birds chirping, river rushing, trees creaking.  That nowhere is my home, at least it was, but I'll be back.  Anyway, besides the shakuhachi I enjoy mostly just other flute music.  Don't really listen to any particular bands or whatnot anymore.  Usually just like to make my own music on my flutes, mostly shakuhachi but sometimes I'll pick up a pennywhistle or shinobue.


理趣経百字の偈
菩薩勝慧者 乃至尽生死 恒作衆生利 而不趣涅槃 般若及方便 智度悉加持 諸法及諸有    一切皆清浄 欲等調世間 令得浄除故 
有頂及悪趣 調伏尽諸有 如蓮体本染 不為垢所染    諸欲性亦然 不染利群生 大欲得清浄 大安楽富饒 三界得自在 能作堅固利

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#7 2006-01-31 08:39:17

ericv
Member
From: Delaware, Ohio
Registered: 2006-01-25
Posts: 9
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

Nice eclectic mix Travis!  I thought I was the only one who swung from Miles Davis to Tool.  Haha.  I do enjoy just about all music but country.  If I'm not listening to Jazz, though, I'm usually listening to Tool.  I've also begun getting lots of indie music from podcasts lately too and that is fun.

Argh...totally forgot to mention System of A Down!

Last edited by ericv (2006-02-02 17:57:50)


Shakpens:::Write like you blow  www.shakblog.com

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#8 2006-01-31 16:27:27

jumbuk
Member
From: South-eastern Australia
Registered: 2005-12-15
Posts: 85

Re: What do you listen to?

Bjork for me as well - only discovered her in the last few years.

Plus Pierre bensusan, Mary Black, Jai Uttal, Patrick Street, Brian Eno, Andrew Mcgregor, Riley Lee, Dylan, Douglas Spotted Eagle, Mary Youngblood, Mum, Sigur Ros, John Renbourne, Fluke, Weather report, tangerine Dream, Kraftwerk etc


... as if nothing is happening.  And it is!

Paul Mitchell, Jumbuktu 2006

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#9 2006-01-31 23:41:29

geni
Performer & Teacher
From: Boston MA
Registered: 2005-12-21
Posts: 830
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

I am listening Kite, from J K Neptune,
I have been listening all day long. There is so much music and ideas there.
And I just discorved a record of John Mglauch with pandit...that famous bansuri player. Its beautifull, electrik guitar, tablas, Bansuri Flute.

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#10 2006-02-01 22:37:26

philipgelb
Chef, musician, teacher
From: Oakland, California
Registered: 2005-10-08
Posts: 135
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

Recently in my CD player:

Evan Parker Electro acoustic ensemble
Steve Lacy -Remains (my fave of all his solo recordings)
Beethoven's late string 4tets
Morton Feldman's "crippled symmetry"
L. Subramanim (some stunning south indian ragas that a student of mine gave me an unmarked CDr of)
Joelle Leandre w/ Urs Leimgruber and Fritz Hauser


Philip Gelb
shakuhachi player, teacher & vegetarian chef
Oakland, CA
http://philipgelb.com  http://myspace.com/philipgelb, http://myspace.com/inthemoodforfood

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#11 2006-02-02 04:06:26

kyoreiflutes
Member
From: Seattle, WA
Registered: 2005-10-27
Posts: 364
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

I've been listening to the SOLARIS soundtrack for some time now. My girlfriend and I never get tired of hearing it, for some reason. I've even played a little along with it. It's incredibly well-paced, electronic-yet-organic, and just has a wonderful space to it. It's hard to believe that it's written by the drummer from The Red Hot Chili Peppers. This album re-cemented my love for Marimba and Vibraphone and Strings; I'm almost jealous of the CD, I think it's so pleasing. I'm a filmmaker, and I'd love to get him to write soundtracks for me, and I always wanted to compose my OWN music!

I still listen to David Sylvian a lot (Secrets of the Beehive and Gone to Earth are both incredible, if not a little new-agey, with some really nice space to them. I suppose I'm really into music that allows for Ken, or Space. "12 notes or 1; it's how you play." I tend to go for minimalist whenever possible, as long as it doesn't go too far into space-opera prog-rock. In fact, I play "Jass" music with some friends, and we keep it spare instrumentally; I play snare with brushes, and that's it. I might get a ride at some point, but I'm picky about finding JUST the right sound.

I also still listen to all my old favorite bands from the 80's, but not the pop stuff; I listen to the Pixies a lot (again, even though they're a rock/punk band, they still have an excellent feel for giving the song texture and room), Dead can Dance, Cocteau Twins, anything off the 4AD label, This Mortal Coil, Nick Cave, of course The Femmes, I'm a HUGE fan of Tom Waits, etc. I listen to a lot of modern stuff like Death Cab and the like, too, but I loves me my old favorites, ya know? They're like old friends, I suppose, an interesting way to travel though time.

I'm also VERY into some of Arvo Part's music, although his Jesus and Bible-centric stuff isn't very good. I mean that musically, although I'm also not into "religious" music. But his Tabla Rasa is perhaps my favorite album of all time. There is a piece called "Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten" that must be heard to believe, but I feel as though it is the best piece of orchestral music ever written. I just don't see how anyone, anytime, anywhere, ever, and I know what I'm saying when I say EVER, could EVER write a piece as amazing as moving as this. It's a piece I'd call a Synesthesia piece, meaning, on a basic level, that it affects you visually and emotionally through audio. If you listen to it, only listen to this recording, and it's preferable to either use great headphones and quiet or a really good stereo, preferably an older analog set, like a Yamaha. But that's me. It's just that important.

Okay, THAT was an essay. Time for sleep.

-E

Last edited by kyoreiflutes (2006-02-02 21:44:50)


"The Universe does not play favorites, and is not fair by its very Nature; Humans, however, are uniquely capable of making the world they live in fair to all."    - D.E. Lloyd

"Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee."    -John Donne

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#12 2006-02-17 01:45:48

Daniel Ryudo
Shihan/Kinko Ryu
From: Kochi, Japan
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 355

Re: What do you listen to?

Geni mentioned that famous bansuri player; probably it's Hariprasad Chaurasia, with John Mclaughlin on Shakti...incredible playing; I'm a big fan of Zakir Hussein's tabla too.  Recently I'm always listening to Bob Dylan, and Bob Dylan, as someone else mentioned; also some Pentangle, Emmylou Harris, Riley Lee, Harold Budd, Akikazu Nakamura's cd of honkyoku from the Kyushu area, and a Milton Nascimento cd that a friend sent me from Sao Paulo, and an electrified kalimba recording, from Zaire?; I love Dead Can Dance too but always seem to listen to them in October.  Bjork is nice too.

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#13 2006-04-01 09:36:46

johnstrr
Member
Registered: 2006-03-27
Posts: 24

Re: What do you listen to?

Bob Marley


In La'kech

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#14 2006-04-19 07:34:32

renegade_division
Member
Registered: 2006-04-01
Posts: 5

Re: What do you listen to?

I love Linkin Park, they even played Shakuhachi in one of their songs.

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#15 2006-04-19 12:48:39

mrosenlof
Member
From: Louisville Colorado USA
Registered: 2006-03-01
Posts: 82

Re: What do you listen to?

I listen to a lot of Jazz.  Right now, I have on a CD by Aaron Weinstein, a young jazz violinist.  I have a small pile of Stan Getz recordings here in my office.

The radio in my car is on either the NPR jazz station or the local NPR classical station.

International stuff, Celtic every now and then.  Japanese: I have more enka than shakuhachi recordings. They're kind of fun in a schmaltzy way.  They remind me of living in Japan in the mid/late sixties.


Mike Rosenlof

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#16 2006-04-30 01:04:56

Michael Howard
Member
From: Kingston WA
Registered: 2006-03-22
Posts: 44
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

Can't seem to get away from the "John Mayor Trio", their cover of the Hendrix tune, "Wait Until Tomorrow" smokes hard!


The Tao is (like) the emptiness of a vessel; and in our employment of it we must be on our guard against all fulness. How deep and unfathomable it is, as if it were the Honoured Ancestor of all things!

www.kolbeflutes.com       http://www.myspace.com/bushidoshakuhachi

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#17 2006-05-09 03:36:26

kenbo
Member
From: Sydney but living in Kanazawa
Registered: 2005-10-24
Posts: 8

Re: What do you listen to?

One track which I can't stop listening to is "Improvisation on the theme of Rokudan" featuring Ravi Shankar, Alla Rakha (tabla), Yamamoto Hozan and Miyashita Susumu on koto. I particularly love Miyashita's koto and speaking of which, does anyone know of Miyashita? I couldn't find any information on him or if he has released anything.

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#18 2006-10-20 07:05:58

Toffe
Member
From: Sweden
Registered: 2006-06-05
Posts: 117

Re: What do you listen to?

That Rokudan recording is what turned me on to Shakuhachi in the first place. I love it! Genious!

I listen to whatever I like at the moment, but here is some of it.

Alot of Progressive rocck like Genesis, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett, Camel, Yes, Jethro Tull, Happy the Man, Glass Hammer, Spock's Beard, Neal Morse, King Crimson, Isildurs Bane and many more.

Other nice stuff like ELO, Supertramp, Polyphonic Spree, The Eagles, Desert Rose band.

My wife is a jazz pianist so we listen alot to Jazz as well, mostly Swedish jazz.

And of course lots of folk music and japanese trad. (mostly shakuhachi)

I'm a Christian so I really enjoy good worship albums, they don't grow on trees but there is a few. My favourite is Keith Green. He died in 83 only 27 years old but he managed to record quite a few great albums.

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#19 2007-05-03 23:45:53

KODOAN.COM
Member
From: NORTH BEND, OREGON
Registered: 2007-01-16
Posts: 24
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

Everything but country.  Outlaw country doesn't count.

Sade' is my goddess but so is Fiona Apple.  Bjork is great - especially the early stuff with the Sugarcubes.  Johnny Cash is probably the closest male version of Bjork - that guy did everything. 

Ofra Hasa - what a voice (check out Im Nin A'lu on 'Gates of Wisdom).  Shriekback did some electronic (I think) Shakuhachi on Coelacanth (from Oil & Gold album).  They are most impressive.  The Femmes are fantastic (tip o' the hat to you, Mr. Ritchie). 

Ravi Shankar is incredible.  So is Big Mamma Thornton. 

Pink, Jimmy Bosch, Ibrahim Ferrer, Joy Division, The Killers, J.S. Bach, Snoop Dogg, Elvis Crespo, 'Chili Peppers, yeah...Everything except country.

Great idea for a thread!

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#20 2007-05-04 09:46:40

Rick McDaniel
Member
Registered: 2007-01-08
Posts: 29

Re: What do you listen to?

First, Native American flute music, whether old or new or new age.

Second, world flutes, to include all forms of flute music, from celtic to silver flute, to recorder, to shakuhachi, to pan flutes, to East Indian bansuri.

Third, new age music, in general, but especially new age with flutes in the mix.

I prefer instrumental music, although vocal textures that are complementary, do not bother me. Spirituality is of particular interest in music, but not religious music itself.

I do not like vocal music very much, although I can enjoy some of it, such as Enya, and similar artists, like Secret Garden, and I do not like any form of loud, noisy, raucus music, to include most forms of rock and roll, any heavy metal, and absolutely no hip-hop/rap or other crude "music" at all.

I find much of the western classical music to be "soulless", and more of an exercise in technical execution.

I like many artists, but my favorite artist is John Huling.

On shakuhachi, I like my teacher's CD's as well as anyone's, (Stan Richardson), but I also like new age players like Riley Lee and Kazu Matsui, as well as some well known Japanese players, like Koga. I find a good deal of shakuhachi music too repetitive, as many players play the same pieces on CD's. (One of the drawbacks of the teaching system?)

After flutes, I like guitar music, especially classical Spanish guitar, in all styles. I rarely like electric guitar in any form. Favorites in that genre include Sabicas, Montoya, Mottola, Eric Hansen, Govi, Shastro, and the finest of all, Los Indios Trabajaras.

Also like traditional oriental music, of various genres, to include flutes, and strings, primarily, including shamisen and pipa, as well as koto, and zither.

Still have a fondness for Austrian zither, as well as lute, and other ancient stringed instruments, from around the world.

I have music from many parts of the world, and listen for the folk sound qualities in world music. I still listen to the island music of Martin Denny, as well as the zither of Anton Karas.

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#21 2007-05-04 12:00:03

shaman141
Member
From: Montreal, QC.
Registered: 2006-02-02
Posts: 154
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

It's a shame that you consider all Hip-Hop to be crude and not even "music" at all. Quite the judgement call on your part. Do you consider poetry to be a "lesser artform"? Perhaps if you actually took the time to look a little deeper-I mean past what stereotypes and commercial Hip-Hop that are presented to the general public, you would find a lot poets creating spiritual Hip-Hop, whose focus is on making great music.

Sean


Find your voice and express yourself, that's the point.

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#22 2007-05-04 15:21:02

radi0gnome
Member
From: Kingston NY
Registered: 2006-12-29
Posts: 1030
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

shaman141 wrote:

It's a shame that you consider all Hip-Hop to be crude and not even "music" at all.

You've got to re-read that. I don't think Rick was saying hip-hop wasn't music, although he made it clear that he thought it was crude. Anyway, it brings to mind a couple thoughts. First is something I think was on one of Brian Eno's oblique strategies cards. Paraphrased, it goes something like "If you don't like it, the problem isn't with the music, but is with your ears". There's a lot in that statement. Part of it is education, you have to learn to appreciate some music. For instance, I used to think the Gil Evans "Svengali" album was about as bad as it gets when I first listened to it. Now, after many years, I think it's one of the coolest things ever recorded. Another part of that paraphrased quote is a simple reality check. It could be a cultural or sub-cultural thing, but if a lot of people are giving a particular artist rave reviews but you just don't get it, the safest initial assumption is that they're probably right and you're wrong. The most problematic music for me is that Tibetan stuff. Not really the low, funny sounding droney chants, but the kind with the crashing cymbels and out-of-tune horns. I'll take their word for it that it takes many years to learn and is difficult. I'm not certain it's supposed to be pleasant sounding, a lot of music isn't supposed to be pleasant, but I have no idea what they're doing.

Another thing is that what I listen to isn't necessarily what I like. For instance, somewhat recently I was exposed to Rob Zombie and Linkin Park. Even now after hearing it, thinking it was cool, very musical and I guess you could say liking it, it's not something I'd ever choose to listen to. In fact, if it wasn't an almost forced situation, I probably never would have listened close enough to realize that there was something to it.

I like hip-hop (I don't listen to it anymore), spacey stuff (don't listen to that much anymore either), jazz (nope, not that either, but a little on my i-pod), country (nope, but I've got the Essential Judd's on my i-pod), acid jazz (got some on my i-pod), jump blues, old R&B, beach/shagging music (lots of that on my i-pod). Names I'll toss out that I feel kind of makes up my life's soudtrack (in chronological order) are: The Beatles, Buffalo Springfield, The Archies, Booker T. and the MG's, Curtis Mayfield, Blue Cheer, Blood Sweat and Tears, Paul Horn, Herbie Mann, Hubert Laws, Don Ellis, Eumir Deodato, Ramsey Lewis, Airto Moriera, Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream, Terje Rypdal, Phillip Glass, Bob Marley, Steel Pulse, Culture Club (laugh if you want, I still think they were good), Micheal Jackson, Wild Asparagus, The Judds, The Mavericks, Beau Jaques, Boozoo Chavis, Wynonie Harris, The Embers... (Uh-oh, one of the problems with I-pods is that you end up with lot of great stuff you don't know the names of!!!), Carlos Di Sarli.


"Now birds record new harmonie, And trees do whistle melodies;
Now everything that nature breeds, Doth clad itself in pleasant weeds."
~ Thomas Watson - England's Helicon ca 1580

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#23 2007-05-04 15:46:21

Rick McDaniel
Member
Registered: 2007-01-08
Posts: 29

Re: What do you listen to?

Yeah, I was saying I don't consider hip-hop/rap, music.

Cultural yes, noise yes, crude and inappropiate language yes, music no. It is simply a marketing ploy for folks who aren't really singers, to make some money in the "music" business. Lots of them are getting rich, but they aren't making music, they are simply offensive, which seems to be the thing to be these days.

I am weary of offensive people.

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#24 2007-05-04 16:55:48

rpowers
Member
From: San Francisco
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 285

Re: What do you listen to?

For no particular reason, I have just remembered a bumper sticker I recently saw:

Don't Tolerate Tolerance--Everybody else is just wrong!


"Shut up 'n' play . . . " -- Frank Zappa
"Gonna blow some . . ." -- Junior Walker
"It's not the flute." -- Riley Lee

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#25 2007-05-04 17:22:32

shaman141
Member
From: Montreal, QC.
Registered: 2006-02-02
Posts: 154
Website

Re: What do you listen to?

You just proved my point Rick- LOOK PAST THE COMMERCIAL, MONEY MAKING CRAP, and you'll find the good stuff. I gotta be blunt. You don't know what you're talking about. I guess it's just easier to just remain ignorant and shove all Hip-Hop in the same box though.


Find your voice and express yourself, that's the point.

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