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#1 2006-03-25 10:37:54

Kerry
Member
From: Nashville, TN
Registered: 2005-10-10
Posts: 183

Kyorei composition origins

Greetings all,
   I've been practicing Takashi Tokuyama's version of Kyorei off his same titled cd. The first half being played in kan. Would this be purely his own interpretation? The only other versions I've heard are all otsu. Considering the age of the composition, it would have to have been composed on a hitoyogiri type flute? I'm by no means making a qualitative judgement of one version over another, but personally, I find it makes for an interesting dynamic beginning in kan. Any historical info or personal thoughts, feelings on playing Kyorei would be greatly appreciated!

Kerry


The temple bell stops, but the sound keeps coming out of the flowers. -Basho

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#2 2006-03-25 12:44:00

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3222
Website

Re: Kyorei composition origins

Kerry wrote:

Greetings all,
   I've been practicing Takashi Tokuyama's version of Kyorei off his same titled cd. The first half being played in kan. Would this be purely his own interpretation? The only other versions I've heard are all otsu. Considering the age of the composition, it would have to have been composed on a hitoyogiri type flute? I'm by no means making a qualitative judgement of one version over another, but personally, I find it makes for an interesting dynamic beginning in kan. Any historical info or personal thoughts, feelings on playing Kyorei would be greatly appreciated!

Kerry

I've heard versions where all is otsu, or starting in otsu and finishing in kan, and another starting in kan and finishing in otsu.

In some schools it's the last honkyoku you learn and in others it's one of the first. Very confusing, that.

Kurahashi sensei said he likes to play it on a 1.1 sometimes for the reason you mentioned about hitoyogiri.

No doubt one of the ethnomusicologists or hogaku scholars on the forum can shed more light.


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#3 2006-03-26 07:26:28

nyokai
shihan
From: Portland, ME
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 613
Website

Re: Kyorei composition origins

According to Keisuke Zenyoji, Kyorei actually derives from the Kinko piece Banshiki-cho, which starts in kan then goes to otsu. Zenyoji says that Banshiki-cho was played a lot in the Nagoya area and eventually evolved into its Zenified style as Kyorei. He also believes that Jin Nyodo decided to do Kyorei all in otsu to make it sound more profound.

Zenyoji is not the only one to claim that Kyorei is derived from Banshiki-cho. If you analyze both pieces very carefully it makes a lot of sense. Because the surface style is so different, the idea seems preposterous at first, but check it out on a structural and melodic level. It's like birds and dinosaurs.

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