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#1 2010-12-15 02:40:50

niko.niko
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From: Japan
Registered: 2010-10-07
Posts: 10
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Feeling the Music

I was watching a presentation by Evelyn Glennie the other day and it got me thinking on whether people feel the Shakuhachi when playing or listening. I know that you can feel the Shakuhachi vibrate etc, but does anyone get any other "sensations" while playing the Shakuhachi? (or listening)

I know that I get a couple of different sensations while playing or listening to music (especially live shakuhachi/ensemble performances) but, I sometimes wonder whether those sensations are just my reaction of "hearing" through my ears.

Here is a link to her talk:
http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/evely … isten.html
If you have the time its about a half hour talk.


Japan - http://wanwan-barkbark.blogspot.com/
「一つ一つの音に色をつけるように弾いている」
‐フジコ へミング

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#2 2010-12-15 23:35:13

Karmajampa
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From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
Website

Re: Feeling the Music

Responding to her comment that she "is teaching the World to listen", I am blind and this has had a profound influence on me in that 'listening' is probably my strongest sense, unlike others to whom 'seeing' is the strongest sense.
I have blown one note on my Shakuhachi and had a woman have tears, others feel tingling, most are 'moved'.

recently I was part of a sixteen man drumming circle, we were following each other repeating a one bar rhythm, halfway around the circle the rhythm would break up and we would start again. After several attempts to complete the circle without losing the rhythm it was recognised that those who were losing the pattern were following by 'looking' so it was decided that we should all close our eyes and 'listen', next round and the rhythm stayed true..

I often 'jam' with others and this is a test to see who is listening and who is not, a good listener is good to jam with, a poor listener is not.

so I guess part of my reply is that we 'feel' not only with our fingers.

Kel.


Kia Kaha !

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#3 2010-12-16 09:42:49

niko.niko
Member
From: Japan
Registered: 2010-10-07
Posts: 10
Website

Re: Feeling the Music

Karmajampa wrote:

recently I was part of a sixteen man drumming circle, we were following each other repeating a one bar rhythm, halfway around the circle the rhythm would break up and we would start again. After several attempts to complete the circle without losing the rhythm it was recognised that those who were losing the pattern were following by 'looking' so it was decided that we should all close our eyes and 'listen', next round and the rhythm stayed true..

I often 'jam' with others and this is a test to see who is listening and who is not, a good listener is good to jam with, a poor listener is not.

Interesting how shutting off one sense allows people to open up others. I guess it allows musicians to feel the rhythm, rather than looking and imagining what the rhythm might do.  The drum circle sounds like a lot of fun as well.

I find while playing Honkyoku for instance that it allows me to listen/feel not only the Shakuhachi but also my body. Concentrating on my breathing, fingers vibrating, diaphragm expanding, vocal chords stretching, almost like a sensation of being able to sing as loud and as clearly as I want... but I would never sing without my Shakuhachi.


Japan - http://wanwan-barkbark.blogspot.com/
「一つ一つの音に色をつけるように弾いている」
‐フジコ へミング

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#4 2010-12-17 09:24:48

lowonthetotem
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From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
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Re: Feeling the Music

so I guess part of my reply is that we 'feel' not only with our fingers.

True sometimes I turn up the volume very loud and sit on the speaker.  Of, course I usually wait until nobody else is home.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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#5 2010-12-17 15:57:39

Karmajampa
Member
From: Aotearoa (NZ)
Registered: 2006-02-12
Posts: 574
Website

Re: Feeling the Music

lowonthetotem wrote:

so I guess part of my reply is that we 'feel' not only with our fingers.

True sometimes I turn up the volume very loud and sit on the speaker.  Of, course I usually wait until nobody else is home.

Bare bum if you are really seriously dedicated.

Kel.


Kia Kaha !

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#6 2010-12-25 14:15:13

Todd Frederick
Member
From: Dos Palos CA USA
Registered: 2009-08-29
Posts: 70

Re: Feeling the Music

I have never heard anyone, or a group, play shakuhachi, except for a few very short internet clips. I need to get some CDs. As I write I'm listening to a CD of wonderful penny whistle music with guitar and other instruments, and it puts my squawks and squeals to shame.

Last edited by Todd Frederick (2010-12-25 14:17:33)

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#7 2010-12-25 14:59:02

J Ross
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From: Vancouver,Washington USA
Registered: 2010-12-18
Posts: 74
Website

Re: Feeling the Music

I was introduced to rim blown flutes a few scant years ago and immediately responded with feeling. Not only the low note drone and notes,but the complete meditative sense I felt when hearing it played. I have since acquired and learned many Native American flutes,primarily rim blown such as the Anasazi/Pueblo,Hopi and Mojave. They have all proven to be a major part of my being and daily ritual.Now,though,I have "discovered" the Shakuhachi and am on the journey to meditation with this most wonderful of instruments. I can understand how Glennie feels.

I remember attending a concert that Glennie performed at with the Oregon Symphony some years back and her whole body plays and feels the music.Sure, many artists demonstrate that as well but her's was different indeed. A delightful artist!!

Jim

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#8 2010-12-26 09:30:21

Yungflutes
Flutemaker/Performer
From: New York City
Registered: 2005-10-08
Posts: 1040
Website

Re: Feeling the Music

There is a book called The Body has a Mind of it's Own by Sandra Blakeslee. In a nutshell, she discusses how our brain, through experiential practice, creates body maps that allow us to extend control outside the body (to tools, instruments etc...) It's a fascinating read not only for performing artists but anyone interested in how the body and mind collaborates for efficiency. It is especially helpful for those who experience Repetitive Strain Injuries. For example, if your brain told your arm that your flute (tool, keyboard, etc...) is an extension of your hand, you would be a less likely candidate for RSI.

niko.niko wrote:

...I know that I get a couple of different sensations while playing or listening to music (especially live shakuhachi/ensemble performances) but, I sometimes wonder whether those sensations are just my reaction of "hearing" through my ears.

I would certainly say that your body feels it. Enjoy the sensations smile

Namaste, Perry


"A hot dog is not an animal." - Jet Yung

My Blog/Website on the art of shakuhachi...and parenting.
How to make an Urban Shakuhachi (PVC)

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#9 2010-12-28 09:52:19

lowonthetotem
Member
From: Cape Coral, FL
Registered: 2008-04-05
Posts: 529
Website

Re: Feeling the Music

Other research shows that the body may have two brains of its own, the one we generally think of and one that inhabits the nuerons that surround our digestive system and torso.  Although the nerve ending are not so densely packed, the area around our gut houses a large concentration of nerve (could also read as "brain") cells in the body.  I think that playing a wind instrument really helps one create a resonance between these two nerve systems through deep breathing, which works to massage the gut, and mental focus on the music.  Google "enteric nervous system" to learn where your "gut feelings" come from.

Deep breathing, such as that required to play shakuhachi, also promotes a healthy immune system, as the lungs massage the large lymph gland called the Thymus, which is just under the breast bone.


"Turn like a wheel inside a wheel."

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