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  •  » Riley's Jinashi, Jiari and Jimori definitions.

#1 2009-05-16 18:09:05

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3204
Website

Riley's Jinashi, Jiari and Jimori definitions.

Riley posted this elsewhere. These are pretty simple and clear.

Riley Lee wrote:

CONCLUSION:
I suggest that #1 Sticky be changed to the following:

[BEGIN QUOTE]

In order to avoid confusion, the following terms and definitions will be used in this section:

Jinashi shakuhachi (地無し) literally ‘without ji’ (generic term that denotes flutes with either little or no ji, in contrast to its literal meaning).

Jimori shakuhachi (地盛り尺八): literally ‘[a] serving of ji’ (denotes shakuhachi where there is some ji in the bore, but not where the entire bore is built up with ji).

Jinuri shakuhachi (地塗り尺八): literally ‘painted or smeared with ji’ (denotes shakuhachi where the entire bore is built up with ji). The term, jiari (地有り): literally ‘ji exists’, also refers to this type of flute. There is no clear delineation between jimori and jinuri/jiari flutes, but in most cases the difference is noticeable.

Note: The difference between the literal meaning of the word ‘jinashi’ and its commonly used meaning is a source of confusion. Examples of more precise terminology to denotes shakuhachi where the material is only bamboo;, with no ji at all, include simply, ‘true jinashi’, or the term ‘senchiku’ (專 竹尺八), literally ‘exclusively bamboo’.

Also, other terms, such as ‘kyotaku’ and ‘hocchiku’ are not included in this list as they are encompassed by the term, jinashi. Furthermore, the inclusion of or lack of urushi (lacquer) or blowing edge inlays in the construction does not affect the definitions of the three terms.

[END QUOTE]

Except for the part about Senchiku which I'm a bit confused about. That seems like it would apply to shakuhachi which have neither ji nor urushi. Most jinashi flutes have at least one coat of urushi to seal the bore and brighten the tone. But I don't have any problem with having a term for flutes that are totally raw bamboo. Is that what you meant Riley?


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#2 2009-05-16 18:49:44

edosan
Edomologist
From: Salt Lake City
Registered: 2005-10-09
Posts: 2185

Re: Riley's Jinashi, Jiari and Jimori definitions.

Tairaku wrote:

Riley posted this elsewhere. These are pretty simple and clear.

Riley Lee wrote:

CONCLUSION:
I suggest that #1 Sticky be changed to the following:

[BEGIN QUOTE]

In order to avoid confusion, the following terms and definitions will be used in this section:

Jinashi shakuhachi (地無し) literally ‘without ji’ (generic term that denotes flutes with either little or no ji, in contrast to its literal meaning).

Jimori shakuhachi (地盛り尺八): literally ‘[a] serving of ji’ (denotes shakuhachi where there is some ji in the bore, but not where the entire bore is built up with ji).

Jinuri shakuhachi (地塗り尺八): literally ‘painted or smeared with ji’ (denotes shakuhachi where the entire bore is built up with ji). The term, jiari (地有り): literally ‘ji exists’, also refers to this type of flute. There is no clear delineation between jimori and jinuri/jiari flutes, but in most cases the difference is noticeable.

Note: The difference between the literal meaning of the word ‘jinashi’ and its commonly used meaning is a source of confusion. Examples of more precise terminology to denotes shakuhachi where the material is only bamboo;, with no ji at all, include simply, ‘true jinashi’, or the term ‘senchiku’ (專 竹尺八), literally ‘exclusively bamboo’.

Also, other terms, such as ‘kyotaku’ and ‘hocchiku’ are not included in this list as they are encompassed by the term, jinashi. Furthermore, the inclusion of or lack of urushi (lacquer) or blowing edge inlays in the construction does not affect the definitions of the three terms.

[END QUOTE]

Except for the part about Senchiku which I'm a bit confused about. That seems like it would apply to shakuhachi which have neither ji nor urushi. Most jinashi flutes have at least one coat of urushi to seal the bore and brighten the tone. But I don't have any problem with having a term for flutes that are totally raw bamboo. Is that what you meant Riley?



If you wish to see a Senchiku, remove from the flute, all of its bamboo....



[With apologies to Kurt Vonnegut]

Last edited by edosan (2009-05-16 18:50:10)


Zen is not easy.
It takes effort to attain nothingness.
And then what do you have?
Bupkes.

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#3 2009-05-16 18:53:41

Tairaku 太楽
Administrator/Performer
From: Tasmania
Registered: 2005-10-07
Posts: 3204
Website

Re: Riley's Jinashi, Jiari and Jimori definitions.

I think I'll check in on this topic in about 180 replies and see how we go! wink


'Progress means simplifying, not complicating' : Bruno Munari

http://www.myspace.com/tairakubrianritchie

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#4 2011-01-29 00:03:28

alejandro9085
Member
Registered: 2011-01-29
Posts: 1

Re: Riley's Jinashi, Jiari and Jimori definitions.

shisha oye!

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